The Sweet Train


Luxury

Introduction/History:

The Aru Ressha, or Sweet Train, is one of a dozen special trains dreamed up by the creative minds of JR Kyushu railway officials on Japan’s southernmost island.

It skirts the broad, blue Omura Bay between Sasebo and Nagasaki during the winter; in summer, the route is between Oita and Hida.

Like its “big sister,” the Seven Stars in Kyushu, the Sweet Train sells out months in advance.

The Sweet Train itinerary lasts a little more than two hours and includes a light lunch and four courses of desserts as beautiful as they are tasty. It’s a must-do option if you get anywhere near Kyushu. The train’s design, food, service and scenery are superb.

The Sweet Train was designed by Mr. Eiji Mitooka, who also designed the Seven Stars and reflects many of its elements.

Lighting and decor employ similar patterns (fabrics and wallpapers in rich hues, often with a nature theme); sumptuous woods and intricate details for those who take time to seek them out.

Rail enthusiasts, for example, must be sure to excuse themselves to wander back towards the lavatory. On the way, they’ll discover a cabinet with several scale-model steam engines and tenders.

Even the bathroom itself is richly decorated and not to be missed.

Accommodations

The self-propelled Sweet Train comprises just two cars. Car No. 1 has a more traditional, open seating plan. Car No. 2 consists of private “booths,” accessible through sliding wooden doors.

Whichever you choose, you’ll marvel at the train’s richly decorated walls, plush furnishings and intricate, wooden sliding doors and shutters.

 

Dining

Elegantly presented, locally sourced, exquisite food and drink are the Sweet Train’s raison d’etre.

Herewith, one diner’s experience:

“Following a starter of orange juice and champagne, the fanciful parade of delicate food started with a colorful bento box of meat, fish and vegetables, all sourced from Kyushu’s finest providers.

Then came three sweets courses, made from a variety of seasonal fruits, followed by a delicacy called mignardises (tea cakes).”

The menu is the brainchild of Mr. Yoshihiro Narisawa, who has a famous restaurant named Narisawa in Tokyo.

The service on the Sweet Train, meanwhile, is top-notch: friendly, knowledgeable and indefatigable. The Sweet Train staff knows how to put on a show.

Lounge Cars

Not applicable

Other

Be forewarned: As noted above, the Sweet Train sells out many months in advance.

The Society of International Railway Travelers® is honored to be the first U.S. travel agency to offer the Sweet Train and the Cruise Train Seven Stars in Kyushu  in a special itinerary. But space is extremely limited. Regardless of the date selected, we are alloted just a handful of spaces.

For an eyewitness account of a trip on the Sweet Train, please click here.

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The Sweet Train rounds a bend. Photo by JR Kyushu
The Sweet Train rounds a bend. Photo by JR Kyushu
A friendly welcome from one of the Sweet Train's expert staff. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy.
A friendly welcome from one of the Sweet Train's expert staff. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy.
Aristically presented, locally sourced, seasonal specialties are served in bento boxes. Note the delicacies cut into the shape of gingko leaves. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy.
Aristically presented, locally sourced, seasonal specialties are served in bento boxes. Note the delicacies cut into the shape of gingko leaves. IRT Photo by Owen Hardy.
A view out the window of Car No. 2 of beautiful Omura Bay. Note the intricate, wooden lattice shutter. IRT photo by Owen Hardy
A view out the window of Car No. 2 of beautiful Omura Bay. Note the intricate, wooden lattice shutter. IRT photo by Owen Hardy
The layout of Car No. 1 follows a more traitional dining car plan. Photo courtesy of JR Kyushu
The layout of Car No. 1 follows a more traitional dining car plan. Photo courtesy of JR Kyushu